Incredible moment Pilot lands helicopter at McDonald’s to collect order

A helicopter pilot with the munchies landed his chopper next to a McDonald’s to grab some food.

At approximately 4:20 pm (seriously) on Saturday, a pilot landed his his chopper onto the lawn next to a McDonald’s in northwest Sydney, got out of the aircraft, entered the restaurant to get food, got back into the helicopter, and flew away.

But in the modern day of documenting every single thing that you do, the man snapped a photo of his chopper in front of McDonald’s before flying away, because stories.

“Oh, for real?” a man can be heard asking in the clip. “I thought it was an emergency.”

Nope. Dude just wanted some Macca’s.

According to 9 News Australia, concerned citizens sent the news outlet a video of the incident, and although it’s bit unusual, the landing may not have been illegal. The  Civil Aviation Safety Authority says that as long as the pilot had the permission of the land owner, the pilot could technically use it to land his aircraft and get some grub as long as it was safe.

The agency is currently investigating the incident in order to determine if the landing and takeoff were safe enough.

How Pilots Prepare For The Boeing 787

How Pilots Prepare For The Boeing 787by  for KLM “What’s in a name?” – that was my first thought. As a pilot, I’m not particularly interested in the name of an aircraft. Instead, I tend to focus on its looks and handling. I am one of the pilots involved in the introduction of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner at KLM. This is how we are preparing for the arrival of this new aircraft.

The introduction of a new aircraft to the fleet is a big thrill to everyone at KLM. It confirms that we have faith in the future of our airline and that we will be working with the very latest technology, allowing us to offer our customers a cutting-edge product. But in order to take a new aircraft into operation, we need to prepare extensively.

Training for the B787

One of the unique aspects of the Dreamliner is that we will be operating it with the same accreditation we have for the B777. Traditionally, commercial pilots are only allowed to fly one type of plane. Transferring to another type usually requires several months’ training. The cockpit of the B787 and B777 are so similar, however, that we are allowed to fly both. KLM will be the first airline in the world to utilise this option on a grand scale.

However, pilots will still have to do additional training. That means consulting the manuals to gain insight into new systems and technology aboard the Dreamliner, and of course simulator training to get a grip on the aircraft’s operating features. At present, only experienced B777 pilots are being trained to fly the new B787. This additional training lasts just over a week, which is followed by two supervised flights aboard the actual aircraft.

Almost real

Since February, KLM has had its own Boeing 787 simulator at the training centre at Schiphol-Oost. You may be surprised to hear that this simulator is not made by Boeing, but by Thales, which supplies the rather unique technology. Because the Dreamliner is a lot like a flying server, packed with computer technology, it is relatively easy to simulate flight behaviour. And because the visual systems are developing fast, the experience aboard a simulator is almost real.

The preparatory training for B777 pilots consists of a several days’ theory training (self-study followed by an exam) and four 3.5-hour sessions in the simulator with an instructor. During these sessions, pilots practice the most critical manoeuvres, including engine failure at take-off, loss of cabin pressure at high altitude, and piloting the aircraft in extreme weather conditions.

Flight data are projected on the window

The most striking new feature for pilots is the so-called Head-Up Display (HUD), which projects the key cockpit instruments on the window, enabling pilots to monitor their instruments as they survey the scene outside. This is especially handy during take-off and landing, compared to previous display systems.

Around 90 pilots have already completed their B787 training and are eager to put their new training into practice in the near future. To keep their skills in shape, they will regularly undergo refresher courses until the real Dreamliners arrive.

Training flight with a competitor

I was also one of a group of pilots who were given a chance to fly a B787 owned by our competitor TUIFLY. This was arranged because KLM needs a number of pilots with experience to operate the first B787 flights. It is remarkable to see pilots extending a helping hand to one another when it comes to safety and operations, despite the fact that they serve competing airlines.

Apart from getting an opportunity to “feel” and operate the actual aircraft, our colleagues at TUI also briefed us on their own experiences with the B787. We can use those experiences to guide our own training. We completed the flight without the uniform jacket and cap, but we were wearing the TUI uniform tie and stripes, so that no one realised there were “strangers” on board.

What a wonderful experience! Anyone who has flown aboard a Dreamliner will tell you it really is a “dream” compared to the previous generation of aircraft – so quiet, pleasant and comfortable. On top of that, the view through the bigger windows is spectacular, in the cockpit as well as the cabin. This new feature is made possible by the use of composite materials, which are stronger than aluminium, in constructing the fuselage.

Fetching the Dreamliner

And now I’m eagerly awaiting the day when I can head off to Seattle with the KLM acceptance team, who will bring the first Dreamliner home (scheduled for Saturday, 14 November). The acceptance team consists of colleagues from various departments, who have played a part in the Dreamliner’s delivery process. Our technical pilots, Captain Frank Hofstra and First Officer Wido de Wilde, will first conduct comprehensive tests to see if the aircraft meets specifications, before the official transfer takes place.

After that, I’ll join the captain and first officer in flying our first Dreamliner back to Amsterdam, where many colleagues and flight aficionados will be awaiting our arrival. This new plane really gives us faith in our operational future.

Man With Disabilities Crawls Off Plane After Airline Fails to Assist Him


By Chris Gordon A man with disabilities crawled off a plane at Reagan National Airport in Arlington, Virginia, Tuesday night after the airline failed to provide an aisle chair and someone to help him get off the plane.

When no one from United Airlines came, and needing to use the restroom, DArcee Neal crawled up the aisle from the middle of the plane to the doorway.

“I mean, it’s humiliating,” he said. “No one should have to do what I did.”

Ironically, Neal was returning from San Francisco where he had a speaking engagement about accessible transportation.

“Half the time, I feel like airlines treat people with disabilities as a secondary concern,” Neal said.

United Airlines said it regrets the delay in providing an aisle chair to assist Neal.

This type of problem is happening too often on various airlines, The National Disability Rights Network said. The Air Carrier Access Act guarantees consistent service to passengers with disabilities, but complaints are up 9 percent in the past year.

“In 2014 here were over 27,500 complaints in reference to things like this, so it is not uncommon,” said Dara Baldwin of the National Disability Rights Network. “I hate to say that.”

Lawyer Amy Scherer said she also has been left waiting on an aircraft, and one time her travel companions had to lift her and carry her off the plane.

“We got tired of waiting that long,” she said.

Advocates for people with disabilities who travel are collecting stories to determine what progress has been made under the Air Carrier Access Act and what still needs to be done.
[via NBC washington]

Etihad: Airline accused of assisting pilot's breach of bail by flying him out of America after 'drunken rampage'

Saravdeep Mann is alleged to have set about Martyn Baylay while yelling: ‘I’m going to kill you. You f***ing British bastard.’

 

 

Etihad Airline accused of assisting pilot's breach of bail by flying him out of America after 'drunken rampage'By Cahal Milmo – Etihad, the flag airline of the United Arab Emirates, has been accused by a British former pilot of spiriting one of his colleagues out of America in breach of his bail conditions following an alleged drunken rampage in a Chicago hotel.

Martyn Baylay, who has combined his work as a commercial pilot with a songwriting career that included penning a British entry to Eurovision, claims he was viciously attacked by an Etihad co-pilot, Saravdeep Mann, two years ago. Mr Mann is alleged to have set about the Briton with a bronze sculpture while yelling: “I’m going to kill you. You f***ing British bastard.”

The alleged assault during a stopover in October 2013 led to Mr Mann leaving the airline. But the incident is now the subject of a damages claim in which Mr Baylay alleges that Etihad knew Mr Mann had alcohol problems and executives arranged in the aftermath of the incident for Mr Mann to be taken out of America despite knowing that the pilot faced criminal charges.

In papers laid before a Chicago court, Mr Baylay, 55, claims that the Abu Dhabi-based carrier had Mr Mann collected from the police station in the city where he was taken after his arrest and changed its flight schedule in order to return him to his home in the Gulf emirate.

It is claimed that Etihad knew Mr Mann, an Indian national, would break the bail bond he had posted, which included an undertaking not to leave the Chicago state of Illinois without permission, when it helped him to leave the country.

Etihad told The Independent that it had not been made aware by the pilot of his bail conditions and had been following its policy of returning its staff to their home base to conduct an investigation.

In his claim, Mr Baylay states: “Etihad collected Mann from the police station and, eventually, Etihad got Mann out of the United States. In order to get Mann out of the United States as quickly as possible, Etihad had to reconfigure its flight schedule and pilot configuration.”

The claim adds: “Any efforts by Etihad… to obstruct the prosecution of Mann (by getting him out of the United States or preventing Baylay from participating in the prosecution of Mann) may constitute a violation [of Illinois law on obstructing justice].”

The airline, whose name means “union” in Arabic, strongly disputes Mr Baylay’s version of events, pointing out that the incident happened while both pilots were off-duty and it had played no role in securing Mr Mann’s bail. Etihad said there had also been nothing in Mr Mann’s conduct to raise concerns about his fitness to fly prior to the alleged assault.

The case nonetheless risks causing concern to Etihad, which has risen to become a major international carrier with annual revenues of £4.9bn since it was founded by royal decree just 12 years ago.

Mr Baylay, who left Etihad this summer and had previously flown with British Midland, is seeking substantial damages from the airline for alleged negligence and for personal injury from Mr Mann, a keen clay pigeon shooter who lists hunting and fishing among his interests.

The lawsuit has its roots in a night out on October 13 2013 when Mr Baylay, Mr Mann and two other members of the cockpit crew for an Etihad Boeing 777 were on a routine layover in Chicago following a flight from Abu Dhabi.

It alleges that Mr Mann drank heavily both before and during an evening meal at a Chicago restaurant, at times becoming “verbally belligerent” and expressing “anti-British and anti-American opinions”.

Lawyers for Mr Baylay, a pilot for more than 20 years, said the Briton agreed to take a jacket left behind by Mr Mann when he left the restaurant early.

The claim states: “At approximately midnight, Baylay heard a knock on the door of his hotel room door and, checking the spy hole, Baylay saw Mann, who Baylay thought had come to apologise for his earlier behaviour and to collect the jacket he left behind.

“Baylay opened the door and, without any warning, was struck on the head with a bronze-bladed ornament… Baylay fell to the floor where Mann struck Baylay again on his leg. Mann then tried to strike Baylay a third time again on the head but Baylay managed to grab the weapon and Man fell on Baylay and said: “I’m going to kill you. You f***ing British bastard.”

The alleged attack left the Briton needing hospital treatment for deep cuts to his head. He required further 82 days leave to recover from the physical and psychological effects of his injuries before returning to work until he decided to resign in August, some 22 months after the incident.

The pilot, who now flies for a budget airline, had originally aspired to becoming a musician and has written several hit songs, including “Come Back”, Britain’s entry to the 2002 Eurovision Song Contest. The tune, sung by Pop Idol finalist Jessica Garlick, came joint third – the highest place for a UK entry since.

Mr Mann, whose father-in-law is also employed by Etihad as a flight simulator instructor, resigned from the airline following his return to Abu Dhabi, according to the claim.

Etihad declined to comment on the details of the claim, saying it had not yet been formally served with the complaint.

In a statement, the airline said: “Etihad Airways takes its duty of care towards all its employees very seriously. Following the incident we provided Martyn Baylay with extensive support and assistance, allowing him time to recover and return to his flying duties.

“This incident happened while both pilots were off-duty. As soon as we were made aware of it, we simply arranged for both pilots to be returned to their home base in Abu Dhabi, so that we could conduct an investigation. This is standard airline policy.”

It added: “The airline was not party to Mr Mann’s bail documents and he did not make us aware of any bail conditions. Mr Mann did not fly for Etihad Airways again and left employment with the airline within a week of his return to Abu Dhabi.”

Mr Mann could not be reached to comment.

[via independent]

Military Pilot Shares The Most Amazing Story Ever. This Is Gold.

1 Military Pilot Shares The Most Amazing Story Ever. This Is Gold.By – tickld – There were a lot of things we couldn’t do in an SR-71, but we were the fastest guys on the block and loved reminding our fellow aviators of this fact.

People often asked us if, because of this fact, it was fun to fly the jet. Fun would not be the first word I would use to describe flying this plane. Intense, maybe. Even cerebral. But there was one day in our Sled experience when we would have to say that it was pure fun to be the fastest guys out there, at least for a moment.

It occurred when Walt and I were flying our final training sortie. We needed 100 hours in the jet to complete our training and attain Mission Ready status. Somewhere over Colorado we had passed the century mark. We had made the turn in Arizona and the jet was performing flawlessly.

My gauges were wired in the front seat and we were starting to feel pretty good about ourselves, not only because we would soon be flying real missions but because we had gained a great deal of confidence in the plane in the past ten months. Ripping across the barren deserts 80,000 feet below us, I could already see the coast of California from the Arizona border. I was, finally, after many humbling months of simulators and study, ahead of the jet.Military Pilot Shares The Most Amazing Story Ever. This Is Gold.

I was beginning to feel a bit sorry for Walter in the back seat. There he was, with no really good view of the incredible sights before us, tasked with monitoring four different radios. This was good practice for him for when we began flying real missions, when a priority transmission from headquarters could be vital.

It had been difficult, too, for me to relinquish control of the radios, as during my entire flying career I had controlled my own transmissions. But it was part of the division of duties in this plane and I had adjusted to it. I still insisted on talking on the radio while we were on the ground, however.

Walt was so good at many things, but he couldn’t match my expertise at sounding smooth on the radios, a skill that had been honed sharply with years in fighter squadrons where the slightest radio miscue was grounds for beheading. He understood that and allowed me that luxury.

Just to get a sense of what Walt had to contend with, I pulled the radio toggle switches and monitored the frequencies along with him. The predominant radio chatter was from Los Angeles Center, far below us, controlling daily traffic in their sector. While they had us on their scope (albeit briefly), we were in uncontrolled airspace and normally would not talk to them unless we needed to descend into their airspace.

We listened as the shaky voice of a lone Cessna pilot asked Center for a readout of his ground speed. Center replied: “November Charlie 175, I’m showing you at ninety knots on the ground.”

Now the thing to understand about Center controllers, was that whether they were talking to a rookie pilot in a Cessna, or to Air Force One, they always spoke in the exact same, calm, deep, professional, tone that made one feel important. I referred to it as the “Houston Center voice.”

I have always felt that after years of seeing documentaries on this country’s space program and listening to the calm and distinct voice of the Houston controllers, that all other controllers since then wanted to sound like that, and that they basically did. And it didn’t matter what sector of the country we would be flying in, it always seemed like the same guy was talking. Over the years that tone of voice had become somewhat of a comforting sound to pilots everywhere. Conversely, over the years, pilots always wanted to ensure that, when transmitting, they sounded like Chuck Yeager, or at least like John Wayne.

Better to die than sound bad on the radios.

Just moments after the Cessna’s inquiry, a Twin Beech piped up on frequency, in a rather superior tone, asking for his ground speed. “I have you at one hundred and twenty-five knots of ground speed.” Boy, I thought, the Beechcraft really must think he is dazzling his Cessna brethren.

Then out of the blue, a navy F-18 pilot out of NAS Lemoore came up on frequency. You knew right away it was a Navy jock because he sounded very cool on the radios.

“Center, Dusty 52 ground speed check”. Before Center could reply, I’m thinking to myself, hey, Dusty 52 has a ground speed indicator in that million-dollar cockpit, so why is he asking Center for a readout?

Then I got it, ol’ Dusty here is making sure that every bug smasher from Mount Whitney to the Mojave knows what true speed is. He’s the fastest dude in the valley today, and he just wants everyone to know how much fun he is having in his new Hornet. And the reply, always with that same, calm, voice, with more distinct alliteration than emotion: “Dusty 52, Center, we have you at 620 on the ground.”

And I thought to myself, is this a ripe situation, or what? As my hand instinctively reached for the mic button, I had to remind myself that Walt was in control of the radios. Still, I thought, it must be done – in mere seconds we’ll be out of the sector and the opportunity will be lost. That Hornet must die, and die now. I thought about all of our Sim training and how important it was that we developed well as a crew and knew that to jump in on the radios now would destroy the integrity of all that we had worked toward becoming. I was torn.

Somewhere, 13 miles above Arizona, there was a pilot screaming inside his space helmet. Then, I heard it. The click of the mic button from the back seat. That was the very moment that I knew Walter and I had become a crew. Very professionally, and with no emotion, Walter spoke: “Los Angeles Center, Aspen 20, can you give us a ground speed check?” There was no hesitation, and the replay came as if was an everyday request. “Aspen 20, I show you at one thousand eight hundred and forty-two knots, across the ground.”

I think it was the forty-two knots that I liked the best, so accurate and proud was Center to deliver that information without hesitation, and you just knew he was smiling. But the precise point at which I knew that Walt and I were going to be really good friends for a long time was when he keyed the mic once again to say, in his most fighter-pilot-like voice: “Ah, Center, much thanks, we’re showing closer to nineteen hundred on the money.”

For a moment Walter was a god. And we finally heard a little crack in the armor of the Houston Center voice, when L.A.came back with, “Roger that Aspen, Your equipment is probably more accurate than ours. You boys have a good one.”

It all had lasted for just moments, but in that short, memorable sprint across the southwest, the Navy had been flamed, all mortal airplanes on freq were forced to bow before the King of Speed, and more importantly, Walter and I had crossed the threshold of being a crew. A fine day’s work. We never heard another transmission on that frequency all the way to the coast.

For just one day, it truly was fun being the fastest guys out there.

20 Awesome Cockpit Selfies Snapped While Airmen Tear Through the Skies

Image: Schweizer Luftwaffe via imgur
Image: Schweizer Luftwaffe via imgur

By – CHARLIE GILBERT for scribol Jet fighter pilots around the globe have elevated the selfie phenomenon to astonishing new heights – quite literally. Armed with photographic equipment such as GoPro cameras and fisheye lenses, they’ve been able to capture dramatic images of themselves on the job – sometimes mid-maneuver or with a stunning backdrop thrown in for good measure. But rather than simply pointing and shooting, these pilots and other flight crew have proven themselves skilled photographers – which is pretty amazing given that they often have a fair few other buttons to press, too.

Here’s one great example, taken by a Swiss Air Force F-18 pilot in what seems to have been February 2013. The subject’s outstretched arms act like an anchor, and two other F-18 jets, one on either side, make the photograph’s symmetry practically perfect. It also doesn’t hurt that the pilot managed to include an awe-inspiring snow-capped landscape in shot.

The capture has all the ingredients to qualify as the ultimate selfie, but hang on to your ejection seats, as there’s more to come. The following 19 images are equally jaw-dropping, featuring everything from near-vertical climbs to dazzlingly kaleidoscopic pyrotechnics.

1. Eurofighter Typhoon Crewmember – Bavarian Tigers/German Air Force (Objektschutzregiment der Luftwaffe)

Image: Bavarian Tigers/German Air Force (Objektschutzregiment der Luftwaffe) via The Aviationist
Image: Bavarian Tigers/German Air Force (Objektschutzregiment der Luftwaffe) via The Aviationist

Looking either side of the helmet in this shot, it’s easy to understand why the striking Eurofighter jet being flown is nicknamed the “Tiger Typhoon.” The distinctly orange and black marked aircraft – which belongs to the German Air Force’s Bavarian Tigers – secured the Best Painted Aircraft Award at the 2014 NATO Tigermeet in northern Germany. Moreover, just beyond the craft’s striking tiger stripes are a few more decorated jets – all part of a huge group formation at the event during which the crewmember pictured managed to snap this awesome selfie.

2. Senior Aircraftman Adam Fletcher – Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team

Image: Royal Air Force
Image: Royal Air Force

British Royal Air Force (RAF) Aerobatic Team senior aircraftman Adam Fletcher looks like he’s braced for a hug above the clouds in this image, which was captured in a Red Arrows Hawk jet while he flew with the RAF aerobatic team in 2014. However, all becomes clear when you notice the reflection in Fletcher’s visor, which reveals that he’s in fact taking an in-flight selfie. What’s more, given that Fletcher has embraced the rule of thirds composition guideline to a tee, it won’t come as a surprise to learn that he’s actually an official Red Arrows photographer. Taken with a Canon 5D Mark III, this shot was honored at the 2014 RAF Photographic Competition.

3. Thomas Kristensen – Royal Danish Air Force (Kongelige Danske Flyvevåben)

Image: Royal Danish Air Force (Kongelige Danske Flyvevåben) via The Aviationist
Image: Royal Danish Air Force (Kongelige Danske Flyvevåben) via The Aviationist

F-16 air-to-air missile exercises are relatively rare, which makes a self-taken shot showing the exact moment when a missile was launched even more exceptional. Respect, then, to Thomas Kristensen, a Royal Danish Air Force pilot who captured his F-16 fighter jet firing an AIM-9L Sidewinder missile in truly spectacular fashion. The still was taken from an October 2012 video recorded by Kristensen’s GoPro camera as he took aim at a flare somewhere above the North Sea.

4. F-15I Pilot – Israeli Defense Forces

Image: Israeli Defense Forces via The Aviationist
Image: Israeli Defense Forces via The Aviationist

This superb self-portrait is particularly notable given the apparent paucity of photos showing aviators released by the Israeli Defense Forces. Still, while the identity of the airman in shot is unspecified, we do know that the image features an Israeli Air Force F-15I – the “I” denoting Israel – initiating a hair-raising upside-down ascent. The golden terrain below is that of Samaria and Judea, while a section of the Dead Sea can also be seen beneath the backseat pilot’s right shoulder.

5. Capt. Jeroen “Slick” Dickens – Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team

Image: Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team
Image: Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team

Okay, proof that the Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team members can take selfies while looking in directions other than to their left. Here, the demonstration team’s Captain Jeroen “Slick” Dickens is upside down – and trailed, or so it seems, by a stream of pyrotechnics. This selfie was snapped during the 2014 Volkel in de Wolken Hamilton Airshow – the largest event of its kind in the Benelux Union, which consists of the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg. Furthermore, the shot becomes more impressive again when you realize that Dickens was flying at speeds of between 115 mph and a lightning 723 mph.

6. Lieut. Commander Nate Barton – Blue Angels/U.S. Navy

Image: @BlueAngelThree
Image: @BlueAngelThree

U.S. Navy Lieutenant Commander Nate Barton flew the left wing position in the Blue Angels Demonstration Squadron in 2013 and 2014 and captured this awesome image in May 2014. Incredibly, Barton was inside a vertical F/A-18 Hornet at the time he snapped the remarkable selfie, and he did so using an ordinary iPhone, which can be seen reflected in his visor. The structure in the background is Annapolis, Maryland’s Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium, which Barton and the rest of the Blue Angels flew over during the 2014 U.S. Naval Academy Commissioning Week. Inevitably, the awe-inspiring picture went viral after it was tweeted.

7. Senior Airman Matthew Bruch – 1st Combat Camera Squadron/U.S. Air Force

Image: U.S. Air Force via The Aviationist
Image: U.S. Air Force via The Aviationist

Pictured directly behind Senior Airman Matthew Bruch of the U.S. Air Force’s 1st Combat Camera Squadron is the famed Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada. Squinting further reveals the skyscrapers of the iconic Las Vegas Strip, near the top of the frame. The sensational selfie was snapped on May 17, 2012, not long after takeoff. It was shot from inside a 65th Aggressor Squadron F-15D, and this particular “Eagle” is almost the same color as the sandy landscape below.

8. Capt. Jeroen “Slick” Dickens – Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team

Image: Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team
Image: Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team

The Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team flies across Europe with a store of GoPro cameras that have seemingly developed a thing for left-facing selfies. Captain Jeroen “Slick” Dickens, for example, couldn’t get enough of this magnificent stretch of coast during the June 2014 Roma International Airshow in Italy. Still, Dickens’ colleague in the fighter jet above him appears to have had his fix, as he looks to be preparing for a change of direction.

9. F-16 Pilot – SOLOTÜRK/Turkish Air Force (Türk Hava Kuvvetleri)

Image: SOLOTÜRK/Turkish Air Force (Türk Hava Kuvvetleri) via The Aviationist
Image: SOLOTÜRK/Turkish Air Force (Türk Hava Kuvvetleri) via The Aviationist

There’s something positively kaleidoscopic about this Turkish Air Force selfie. Flying with the force’s SOLOTÜRK F-16 display team in the skies above Kyrenia in Northern Cyprus, the unidentified pilot launched a series of flares as he carefully maneuvered his jet. This was partly for the benefit of unseen spectators below, but it would also mightily please anyone who’s glimpsed the scene in the resulting photograph. Interestingly, when flares aren’t being used as exploding eye candy, they’re utilized to confound enemy heat-seeking missiles.

10. Sgt. Johnson Barros – Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira)

Image: Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira)/Sgt. Johnson Barros
Image: Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira)/Sgt. Johnson Barros

This is what Sgt. Johnson Barros looks like without a visor. Here seated in a T-27 Tucano, the Brazilian Air Force photographer appears as if he’s feeling the g-forces – and it’s hardly surprising, considering his position. Luckily for us, this sideways selfie provided the optimal perspective for squeezing another T-27 into the shot, which makes the resulting image even more impressive. Below – or rather, to the side – is a stretch of woodland in the state of São Paulo, somewhere in or around Pirassununga.

11. F-16 Pilot – Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team

Image: Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team via The Aviationist
Image: Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team via The Aviationist

It goes without saying that if there’s one thing pilots love, it’s planes; indeed, it appears that if they’re not flying them, they’re often staring at them. Case in point: this pilot with the Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team, who can’t seem to take his eyes off an Arke Boeing 787-8, the Netherlands’ first ever Dreamliner, as it cruises through the air to his left. The team accompanied the passenger jet as it entered Dutch airspace, and naturally this was an event worthy of a stunning GoPro selfie.

12. Sgt. Johnson Barros – Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira)

Image: Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira)/Sgt. Johnson Barros
Image: Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira)/Sgt. Johnson Barros

By now Sgt. Johnson Barros has pretty much established himself as an airborne selfie legend. This incredible shot – equal parts sublime and ridiculous – was snapped somewhere above Pirassununga, São Paulo, and while the scenery isn’t especially eye-catching, Barros’ jaw-dropping composition more than makes up for it. In the immediate background is a cluster of T-27 Tucanos from the air force’s Esquadrilha da Fumaça; and judging by the reflection in Sgt. Barros’ visor, the photo was taken using his trusty EOS 5D Mark II and fisheye lens.

13. T-6 Texan Pilot – Israeli Air Force

Image: Israeli Air Force via The Glimpse
Image: Israeli Air Force via The Glimpse

The cool gaze of this Israeli Air Force (IAF) pilot almost belies the fact that his North American-made T-6 Texan aircraft is practically upside down. He doesn’t seem particularly troubled, but who knows what the residents of Tel Aviv below made of the airplane’s aerial acrobatics? In case any were concerned, the IAF posted on its Facebook page that the plane actually had a pair of pilots and that the one featuring in the selfie – thanks to a GoPro attached to the cockpit – wasn’t at the flight controls. Incidentally, just above the wing and to the right – and some way down – is Rabin Square, Tel Aviv’s main plaza.

14. Sgt. Johnson Barros – Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira)

Image: Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira)/Sgt. Johnson Barros
Image: Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira)/Sgt. Johnson Barros

Not that you’d recognize him behind the visor and oxygen mask, but this is Brazilian Air Force photographer Sgt. Johnson Barros again. However here, instead of Barros looking straight ahead as someone would in a typical selfie, his camera is pointing up at him and six A-29 Super Tucanos from the Brazilian Air Force’s Esquadrilha da Fumaça – or smoke squadron – a demonstration unit based at the Air Force Academy in Pirassununga in the state of São Paulo. What’s more, whether or not it was planned, the reflection of Barros’ seat frames the impressive formation perfectly.

15. Sgt. Johnson Barros – Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira)

Image: 177th Fighter Wing, NJANG
Image: 177th Fighter Wing, NJANG

Not that you’d recognize him behind the visor and oxygen mask, but this is Brazilian Air Force photographer Sgt. Johnson Barros again. However here, instead of Barros looking straight ahead as someone would in a typical selfie, his camera is pointing up at him and six A-29 Super Tucanos from the Brazilian Air Force’s Esquadrilha da Fumaça – or smoke squadron – a demonstration unit based at the Air Force Academy in Pirassununga in the state of São Paulo. What’s more, whether or not it was planned, the reflection of Barros’ seat frames the impressive formation perfectly.

16. Sgt. Johnson Barros – Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira)

Image: Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira)/Sgt. Johnson Barros
Image: Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira)/Sgt. Johnson Barros

A GoPro isn’t a prerequisite for a great jet fighter-based selfie, as demonstrated by this outstanding capture from Brazilian Air Force photographer Sgt. Johnson Barros. Sgt. Barros took the shot from the rear seat of a Dassault Mirage 2000D while flying over Natal in Brazil’s northeastern Rio Grande do Norte state. His camera of choice was a Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital SLR equipped with a fisheye lens, and the result is spectacular – not least for the view it offers of Lagoa do Bonfim, the state’s biggest lagoon. The photo was snapped in late 2013, during the air force’s Cruzeira da Sul exercise.

17. F-16 Pilot – Royal Norwegian Air Force (Luftforsvaret)

Image: Luftforsvaret (Royal Norwegian Air Force)/Forsvarets Mediesenter
Image: Luftforsvaret (Royal Norwegian Air Force)/Forsvarets Mediesenter

This Royal Norwegian Air Force pilot’s expression can’t quite be made out, but judging by his eyes, you’d guess that it’s achingly cool – and perhaps just a little bit self-satisfied. Taken in 2014 as part of the air force’s Cold Response exercise, the exquisitely composed selfie perfectly captures the snow-covered mountains of Norway. Interestingly, the photograph’s wide scope was made possible by the F-16’s unobscured bubble canopy, which gives pilots a superbly clear point of view and eliminates blind spots.

18. Shenyang J-15 Pilot – People’s Liberation Army Naval Air Force

Image: People’s Liberation Army Naval Air Force via Chinese Military Review
Image: People’s Liberation Army Naval Air Force via Chinese Military Review

No, this isn’t an alien at the controls of a deep-water submarine; it’s an unidentified Shenyang J-15 “Flying Shark” pilot belonging to China’s People’s Liberation Army Naval Air Force (PLANAF). Bulk manufacturing of the jet started in December 2013, and it has quickly become the go-to airplane for pilots stationed on the PLAN Liaoning aircraft carrier, which can just be seen in the bottom-right of this sub-aquatic-looking selfie.

Capt. Jeroen “Slick” Dickens – Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team

Image: Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team
Image: Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 Demo Team

Owing to the angle of this GoPro shot, it almost looks as though Captain Jeroen “Slick” Dickens is flying a space rocket as opposed to his Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 jet. His climb seems nigh on vertical, and there’s even a trail of smoke for dramatic effect. However, this is of course more than likely all part of the pilot’s aerobatic performance – here, at the 2014 Volkel in de Wolken Hamilton Airshow – which would typically include a climb out, followed by a split s, a high-speed pass and a vertical climb.

Pilots and flight attendants share their secret tips and tricks for beating jetlag (and no, coffee doesn't help)

 

  • British Airways and Virgin Atlantic crews reveal all on beating travel fatigue
  • Jetlag beating tricks include pre-sleep snacks and a quick run before bed
  • After a night flight, only sleep for three hours and force yourself to exercise
Pilot Kat Woodruffe points out that how you approach jetlag should depend on the direction you’re travelling
Pilot Kat Woodruffe points out that how you approach jetlag should depend on the direction you’re travelling

By ELLEN SCOTT FOR MAILONLINE – Exhaustion, delirium and insomnia – we’ve all struggled with jetlag after enduring a long-haul flight.

But the experts say that small things like eating Brazil nuts before bed and investing in an eye mask could help beat the travel fatigue.

MailOnline Travel spoke with British Airways and Virgin Atlantic flight attendants and pilots who spend their lives passing through the time zones – and here is what they said. 

Follow the 10.30 rule

British Airways pilot Mark Vanhoenacker advises passengers to follow the 10.30 rule on every flight
British Airways pilot Mark Vanhoenacker advises passengers to follow the 10.30 rule on every flight

BA Pilot and author of Skyfaring: A Journey With A Pilot, Mark Vanhoenacker, has a regimented approach to dealing with jetlag. He follows his own 10.30am rule to figure out whether a nap is the best idea.

He said: ‘The big debate travellers face when they land in a far-off city, or when they arrive home from a long journey, is whether to go to sleep or not.

‘I have a 10.30am rule. If I reach the hotel room or my bedroom at home by 10.30am, I’ll go to sleep for a couple of hours.

‘If I get there after 10.30am, I’ll force myself – with exercise, espresso, whatever it takes – to stay up until it’s a reasonable bedtime on my new time zone.’

Face the day(light)

Try to get as much daylight as possible, says British Airways pilot Helen MacNamara.

She said: ‘Even if it’s the middle of the night on your body clock, sunshine will help keep you awake.

‘Sit outside at cafes and restaurants if it’s warm enough!’

Force yourself to exercise

The aim of the game is to stay awake until your destination’s bedtime.

Helen recommends popping on your sports kit the moment you arrive, even if it’s just for a 20-minute walk to wake up the body and boost endorphins.

Eat Brazil nuts

When it’s finally time to rest your head, jetlag tends to give you a dose of insomnia. Tackle it by eating foods that induce sleep.

Helen makes sure to always carry Brazil nuts on her travels, and has a glass of milk before bed.

She said: ‘If you start feeling hungry during the night you’ll never get back to sleep.’

Be aware of the direction you’ve travelled

Pilot Kat Woodruffe points out that how you approach jetlag should depend on whether you’re travelling East or West.

She said: ‘When travelling East you can wake up too late in the morning to do anything productive and then can’t get to sleep at night.’

When travelling West ‘you can wake up to early and want to go to sleep by 5pm.’

So when travelling East, your priority should be waking yourself up at a reasonable time.

Kat suggests sleeping with the curtains open to let in plenty of light, and hiding your phone somewhere in your hotel room, so that when the alarm goes off you’ll have to get up to find it.

Westward travellers should save the best part of their day for when they’ll feel worst – at around 4-5pm when they’ll want to sleep. Instead of giving into napping, save your favourite sightseeing trip, café trip, or walk around the city until then, so you have something to look forward to.

Invest in an eye mask

Flight attendant Britney Wilson considers eye masks essential. Make sure you take them onboard for longhaul flights, and pop them on to tell your body to switch off and wind down.

Britney also suggests giving into sleep when you really need it.

She said: ‘If you’re really tired, set an alarm for a 40-minute nap and make sure you get up after this time.

‘This is enough to keep me going until night-time, wherever I am.’

Eat at UK meal times

Only recommended for short trips, one way to prevent jetlag is sticking to your usual UK mealtimes, says pilot Chloe Harrison, even if that means waking up for breakfast at 3am.

That way, you won’t have to adjust back to normal when you return. For longer journeys, it’s best to adjust to local times.

After a night flight, only sleep for three hours

Olivia Humphrey, a senior cabin crew member at Virgin Atlantic, deals with overnight flights by resisting the urge to sleep all day.

Instead, she suggests sleeping for just three hours.

Olivia said: ‘I’ve been told a sleep cycle is an hour and a half so I try to avoid waking up mid sleep cycle.

‘I always set my alarm for after a three hour sleep and make sure I get up.’

Skip the caffeine

As tempting as it is to reach for shots of espresso when you’re feeling completely run down, pilots and cabin crew agree that caffeine isn’t a wise idea.

Camille John, a cabin crew member for five years, said: ‘I minimise my caffeine intake because while a cup of coffee may give me a short burst of energy, in the longer term I find it keeps me up when I’m trying to get rest.’

Try drinking plenty of water instead, and have a cup of camomile tea at night to help you fall asleep.

And finally, don’t panic

It’s easy to let looming jetlag make you imagine that you’re going to feel a lot worse than you actually do.

Flight attendant Rebecca Wadsworth used to get anxious about not sleeping at the right time, which ended up making it harder for her to sleep at all.

The best thing for her was to stop worrying about when she goes to sleep and if she’s doing the right things.

Instead, she just focuses on getting eight hours sleep in any 24 hour period, never mind if it’s from 2pm.

As well as following tips on exercise, diet, and sleep, it’s important to focus on staying relaxed, pushing through, and going about your day as close to normal as possible.

[via dailymail]

 

The 9 fastest piloted planes in the world

The world’s fastest manned planes are nothing short of engineering marvels.

Capable of flitting through the air at multiple times the speed of sound, these planes take both pilot and aircraft both to the fringe of science fiction.

Although a number of these aircraft have since been retired from use, they continue to be the fastest manned aircraft in human history.

The designs and advances achieved with these planes have also left an immense impact upon the development of the planes that succeeded them.

Here’s a look at the world’s 9 fastest manned aircraft ever flown.

1. F-4 Phantom II1 F-4 Phantom II

Maximum speed: 1,472 miles per hour
Maximum range: 1,615 miles
First flight: May 27, 1958
The supersonic F-4 Phantom II jet was originally developed just for the US Navy and officially entered into service in 1960. In the mid-1960s, the interceptor was adopted by the US Marine Corps and the US Air Force.
The F-4 carries more than 18,000 pounds of weapons including air-to-air missiles, air-to-ground missiles, and various bombs. The primary fighter jet during the Vietnam War, the Phantom II was gradually replaced by more the F-15 and the F-18 Hornet.

2. Convair F-106 Delta Dart2 Convair F-106 Delta Dart

Maximum speed: 2,170 miles per hour
Maximum range: 1,599 miles
First flight: March 6, 1964
The Soviet MiG-25, which was first introduced in 1970, was built as a supersonic interceptor and reconnaissance aircraft. Due to the aircraft’s large wings, the US assumed it was a highly maneuverable fighter; instead, the Foxbat needed the large wings due to its weight.
The MiG-25’s maximum speed of Mach 3.2 is not sustainable without causing engine damage. It’s top sustainable speed is 1,920 miles per hour (Mach 2.83).

3. Mikoyan MiG-31 Foxhound3 Mikoyan MiG-31 Foxhound

Maximum speed: 2,170 miles per hour
Maximum range: 1,599 miles
First flight: March 6, 1964
The Soviet MiG-25, which was first introduced in 1970, was built as a supersonic interceptor and reconnaissance aircraft. Due to the aircraft’s large wings, the US assumed it was a highly maneuverable fighter; instead, the Foxbat needed the large wings due to its weight.
The MiG-25’s maximum speed of Mach 3.2 is not sustainable without causing engine damage. It’s top sustainable speed is 1,920 miles per hour (Mach 2.83).

4. Mikoyan Ye-1524 Mikoyan Ye-152

Maximum speed: 2,170 miles per hour
Maximum range: 1,599 miles
First flight: March 6, 1964
The Soviet MiG-25, which was first introduced in 1970, was built as a supersonic interceptor and reconnaissance aircraft. Due to the aircraft’s large wings, the US assumed it was a highly maneuverable fighter; instead, the Foxbat needed the large wings due to its weight.
The MiG-25’s maximum speed of Mach 3.2 is not sustainable without causing engine damage. It’s top sustainable speed is 1,920 miles per hour (Mach 2.83).

5. XB-70 Valkyrie5 XB-70 Valkyrie

Maximum speed: 2,170 miles per hour
Maximum range: 1,599 miles
First flight: March 6, 1964
The Soviet MiG-25, which was first introduced in 1970, was built as a supersonic interceptor and reconnaissance aircraft. Due to the aircraft’s large wings, the US assumed it was a highly maneuverable fighter; instead, the Foxbat needed the large wings due to its weight.
The MiG-25’s maximum speed of Mach 3.2 is not sustainable without causing engine damage. It’s top sustainable speed is 1,920 miles per hour (Mach 2.83).

6. Bell X-2 “Starbuster”6 Bell X-2 “Starbuster”

Maximum speed: 2,170 miles per hour
Maximum range: 1,599 miles
First flight: March 6, 1964
The Soviet MiG-25, which was first introduced in 1970, was built as a supersonic interceptor and reconnaissance aircraft. Due to the aircraft’s large wings, the US assumed it was a highly maneuverable fighter; instead, the Foxbat needed the large wings due to its weight.

7. Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25 Foxbat7 Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25 Foxbat

Maximum speed: 2,170 miles per hour
Maximum range: 1,599 miles
First flight: March 6, 1964
The Soviet MiG-25, which was first introduced in 1970, was built as a supersonic interceptor and reconnaissance aircraft. Due to the aircraft’s large wings, the US assumed it was a highly maneuverable fighter; instead, the Foxbat needed the large wings due to its weight.
The MiG-25’s maximum speed of Mach 3.2 is not sustainable without causing engine damage. It’s top sustainable speed is 1,920 miles per hour (Mach 2.83).

8. SR-71 Blackbird8 SR-71 Blackbird

Maximum speed: 2,200 miles per hour
Maximum range: 3,682 miles
First flight: December 22, 1964
The SR-71, designed by Lockheed Martin, was a marvel of a plane. It flew at altitudes of over 80,000 feet at speeds greater than 2,000 miles an hour. The plane, engineered for surveillance, flew for more than 30 years and it was capable of outrunning anti-aircraft missiles lobbed at it.
For perspective, on its retirement flight from Los Angeles to Washington, DC, the SR-71 flew coast to coast in only 67 minutes.

9. X-159 X-15

Maximum speed: 4,520 miles per hour
First flight: June 8, 1959
The world’s fastest manned aircraft is part rocket, part jet. NASA’s X-15 flew for the first time on June 8, 1959 after successfully deployed at 45,000 feet from another aircraft. A few years later, on October 3, 1967, the X-15 pulverized all flight speed records with a stunning 4,520 miles per hour or Mach 6.72 speed.
The X-15 flew a total of 199 flights over a course of 30 hours and 13 minutes.

How cabin crew fashion has changed through time

Photo: Monarch Airlines
Photo: Monarch Airlines
By  – Aircraft cabin crew are some of the glossiest staff in customer service. But how have their uniforms changed over time?

If you’ve been on a plane recently and you’ve looked up at the cabin crew, bustling down the plane with the trolley, or attending to your every want and need during the flight, you might not have taken a second’s thought to observe what they were wearing.

But for the cabin crew staff member, this is of vital importance. Aspiring cabin crew members primp and prime for their interviews, before landing one of the glossiest jobs in customer service.

Your hair must be shiny, your nails filed, your shoes comfortable but glamorous enough to pass on a luxury jet.

Photo: Monarch Airlines
Photo: Monarch Airlines

The high standards set by airlines for cabin crew have remained unchanged over the years, but the uniforms have moved with the times.

Monarch airlines uniforms in 1968  Photo: Monarch Airlines
Monarch airlines uniforms in 1968 Photo: Monarch Airlines

This year, the year that Queen Elizabeth II celebrates her longest reign on the throne, Monarch Airlines have dug through their archive to observe how fashions have evolved in the sky as well as on the ground.

Ruth Turner has been a cabin crew member with Monarch airlines since the early 1980s.

Monarch Airlines in 1990  Photo: Monarch Airlines
Monarch Airlines in 1990 Photo: Monarch Airlines

“I have really loved wearing every different uniform I’ve had during my 33 years with the company,” she says.

“When I put on my uniform and my heels, I instantly feel both glamorous and professional, and wearing it fills me with pride, and gives me the confidence to deal with anything that should come my way. When we’re altogether as a crew, there is a feeling of belonging.”

Monarch Airlines in 1981  Photo: Monarch Airlines
Monarch Airlines in 1981 Photo: Monarch Airlines

Damon Bishop has been working as cabin crew staff since 1993. When he started, there were two types of uniform – one for summer and one for winter.

“There were warmer and darker colours for the winter, with gloves and heavy coats, while the summer uniforms were cooler in fresher and lighter shades,” he explains.

Monarch Airlines in 1968  Photo: Monarch Airlines
Monarch Airlines in 1968 Photo: Monarch Airlines

“Male crew members wore a black blazer, white shirt with a grey and yellow tie and checked trousers, which were often referred to as Rupert Bear trousers! The crew were definitely noticed and you could see the passengers looking at the crew as they passed through the airport.”

The uniform worn by cabin crew members have long made tourists turn and look. “Our uniform is a powerful symbol of the brand,” Bishop says. “It makes us stand out from the crowd and can change the mood of people around us.”

Monarch Airlines in 1968  Photo: Monarch Airlines
Monarch Airlines in 1968 Photo: Monarch Airlines

“I think the hat is one uniform item that should make a return. Glamour is in the airport, on the runway and in the aisle. A hat finishes the look and gets us noticed. We wear hats for special and smart occasions and this should also be one of those special occasions.

For Ruth Turner, it’s the 70s that appeal the most. “If I could have chosen a decade to work in it would have been the 1970s. Package holidays were just beginning to take off then, and the life of an air stewardess was exciting and glamorous. I would have loved to have worn the uniform with the yellow mini dress – it was just gorgeous!”

Monarch Airlines in 1972  Photo: Monarch Airlines
Monarch Airlines in 1972 Photo: Monarch Airlines

But it’s your first that you remember.

Turner’s debut remains her favourite: “a navy blue wool/crepe suit with a yellow Swiss cotton blouse in a navy paisley print. The hat was small, sort of like a saucer!” she says.

“We also had navy uniform shoes, both outdoor and cabin shoes. The uniform was incredibly smart, classic and very comfortable to wear.”

From the archives, this is how Monarch have celebrated all those years in the sky. Fashion isn’t just for the people on the ground – it even finds its way into the air space.

[via The Telegraph]